most obstreperous

conelradstation:

MORE.

John Coltrane in Jazz (dir. Ken Burns, 2000)

(via streetetiquette)

design-is-fine:

Interior of the Studio 54, 1977-81. New York. Interior Design: Ron Doud, lighting design: Brian Thomson. More to see: The Nightclub Years © ian schrager company

Schrager was the co-owner and co-founder of the Studio 54, together with Steve Rubell. It was originally an Opera House, designed by architect Eugene De Rosa in 1927. They used the space’s original theatrical structure to constantly change the look and feel of the club.

The one and only..#studio54 #legendary

mymodernmet:

Korean artist Do Ho Suh’s colorfully transparent replication of his NYC apartment, on display at the Contemporary Austin until January 11, 2015, marks the end of his Home series.

(via skinnyevilcunt)

antipahtico:

Steve Buscemi

antipahtico:

Steve Buscemi

fullten:

Cornell West has degrees from Harvard, and Princeton. Taught at Harvard and the University of Paris, and was in the fucking Matrix… 
This never was about clothing, attitude, stature, or economic status, this is about black vs white. This is what the fuck racism is.

fullten:

Cornell West has degrees from Harvard, and Princeton. Taught at Harvard and the University of Paris, and was in the fucking Matrix… 

This never was about clothing, attitude, stature, or economic status, this is about black vs white. This is what the fuck racism is.

(Source: theladyinthestripeddress, via euo)

“You think man can destroy the planet? What intoxicating vanity. Let me tell you about our planet. Earth is four-and-a-half-billion-years-old. There’s been life on it for nearly that long, 3.8 billion years. Bacteria first; later the first multicellular life, then the first complex creatures in the sea, on the land. Then finally the great sweeping ages of animals, the amphibians, the dinosaurs, at last the mammals, each one enduring millions on millions of years, great dynasties of creatures rising, flourishing, dying away — all this against a background of continuous and violent upheaval. Mountain ranges thrust up, eroded away, cometary impacts, volcano eruptions, oceans rising and falling, whole continents moving, an endless, constant, violent change, colliding, buckling to make mountains over millions of years. Earth has survived everything in its time. It will certainly survive us. If all the nuclear weapons in the world went off at once and all the plants, all the animals died and the earth was sizzling hot for a hundred thousand years, life would survive, somewhere: under the soil, frozen in Arctic ice. Sooner or later, when the planet was no longer inhospitable, life would spread again. The evolutionary process would begin again. It might take a few billion years for life to regain its present variety. Of course, it would be very different from what it is now, but the earth would survive our folly, only we would not. If the ozone layer gets thinner, ultraviolet radiation sears the earth, so what? Ultraviolet radiation is good for life. It’s powerful energy. It promotes mutation, change. Many forms of life will thrive with more UV radiation. Many others will die out. Do you think this is the first time that’s happened? Think about oxygen. Necessary for life now, but oxygen is actually a metabolic poison, a corrosive gas, like fluorine. When oxygen was first produced as a waste product by certain plant cells some three billion years ago, it created a crisis for all other life on earth. Those plants were polluting the environment, exhaling a lethal gas. Earth eventually had an atmosphere incompatible with life. Nevertheless, life on earth took care of itself. In the thinking of the human being a hundred years is a long time. A hundred years ago we didn’t have cars, airplanes, computers or vaccines. It was a whole different world, but to the earth, a hundred years is nothing. A million years is nothing. This planet lives and breathes on a much vaster scale. We can’t imagine its slow and powerful rhythms, and we haven’t got the humility to try. We’ve been residents here for the blink of an eye. If we’re gone tomorrow, the earth will not miss us.”

—    Michael Crichton, Jurassic Park / Congo (via wordsnquotes)

(via infinity-imagined)

“Nothing was ever in tune. People just blindly grabbed at whatever there was: communism, health foods, zen, surfing, ballet, hypnotism, group encounters, orgies, biking, herbs, Catholicism, weight-lifting, travel, withdrawal, vegetarianism, India, painting, writing, sculpting, composing, conducting, backpacking, yoga, copulating, gambling, drinking, hanging around, frozen yogurt, Beethoven, Back, Buddha, Christ, TM, H, carrot juice, suicide, handmade suits, jet travel, New York City, and then it all evaporated and fell apart. People had to find things to do while waiting to die. I guess it was nice to have a choice.”

—   Charles Bukowski, Women (via whyallcaps)

(via whyallcaps)

misandry-mermaid:

stfueverything:

dbvictoria:

With all the heat Anita Sarkeesian gets for her Tropes series, you’d think it was a new topic, but Gene Siskel & Roger Ebert had a discussion on a similar theme when they were talking about the influx of slasher movies on their show in 1980.

(x)

34 years later and this is STILL relevant

RIP to both of these great men.

(via cinematicfantastic)

80slove:

On set of Pet Sematary

gage!

80slove:

On set of Pet Sematary

gage!

sixpenceee:

Statue of Saint Bartholomew, who was skinned-alive by the Romans for not renouncing his christian-faith. In this statue, the sculptor depicts Bartholomew with muscles, bones, and veins for all to see. Draped around his shoulders and waist is his own skin. (Another Ghostly Statue:René de Chalon)

sixpenceee:

Statue of Saint Bartholomew, who was skinned-alive by the Romans for not renouncing his christian-faith. In this statue, the sculptor depicts Bartholomew with muscles, bones, and veins for all to see. Draped around his shoulders and waist is his own skin. (Another Ghostly Statue:René de Chalon)

(via honey-andtar)

Bogey forever <3

(Source: humphreysbogart, via nvbianprincess)